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Dissertation Quotes Or Italics For Tv

 

Titles of works

 

 

The titles of certain works are indicated with quotation marks, others with italics, and yet others with regular type.

 

The style presented here is consistent with The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.) and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.), and is appropriate for most academic and professional writing. Newspapers tend to favor quotation marks in place of italics for most titles.

 

​Titles set in italicsTitles in quotation marksTitles set in regular typeBlogs Books Cartoons or comic strips Journals Legal cases Magazines Musical albums Musical compositions identified by name Newspapers Online databases (MLA: italicize; Chicago: regular type) Operas Paintings Plays Poems (long) Radio shows Sculptures Television shows Websites (MLA: all; Chicago: some) Articles in magazines, journals, newspapers, and encyclopedias Blog entries Chapters in books Episodes of television shows Essays Photographs Poems (short) Short stories Songs Unpublished manuscripts, speeches, dissertations, theses, and lectures Awards Musical compositions not identified by name Political documents Scriptural works (including the Bible) Sections, books, and prayers within scriptural works Works of antiquity

 

 

 

 

In a thesis or journal you write all sentences yourself, but on some occasions you prefer to take a piece of text from another source. If you do, should you use quotation marks only, or italicize it, or use both, to identify that you have not written it?

Example for quoting directly from a source:

  1. This can, according to Someone et al. [1], be seen as "an excellent way of representing a piece of text quoted from another source", and therefore it's emphasized.
  2. This can, according to Someone et al. [1], be seen as "an excellent way of representing a piece of text quoted from another source", and therefore it's emphasized.
  3. This can, according to Someone et al. [1], be seen as an excellent way of representing a piece of text quoted from another source, and therefore it's emphasized.

Example for a definition with a source:

  1. Wikipedia defines italic as "a semi-cursive, slightly sloped style of handwriting and calligraphy that was developed during the Renaissance in Italy" [2].
  2. Wikipedia defines italic as "a semi-cursive, slightly sloped style of handwriting and calligraphy that was developed during the Renaissance in Italy" [2].
  3. Wikipedia defines italic as a semi-cursive, slightly sloped style of handwriting and calligraphy that was developed during the Renaissance in Italy [2].

Are there are any style guides or recommendations that refer to italicized text, for either quotes or definitions? And related to the two examples, what is the recommended way to distinguish between a quote and a definition?

Edit: note that if a style guide is provided, the guide should be followed. This question relates to situations where no style guide is required.

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